Misophonia

Re: Misophonia

Postby ohtheprofanity » October 10th, 2016, 4:24 pm

I watched the debates last night. From a misophonia standpoint, it was downright unbearable at times.

I won't go into what I thought from a non-misophonia standpoint because this isn't the appropriate thread for that.
User avatar
ohtheprofanity
 
Posts: 11
Joined: October 3rd, 2013, 5:57 am
Gender: Female
Issues: Anxiety, depression, misophonia, eating disorder (anorexia, purging subtype)
preferred pronoun: she

Re: Misophonia

Postby everyonecanbuzzoff » October 11th, 2016, 12:46 pm

Misophonia is the biggest issue I have getting through the day. I have struggled with it my entire life. I remember being 5 or 6 and yelling at my brother because he wouldn't slow down enough to stop slurping and smacking his cereal (he would take 4 spoonfuls at a time THEN CHEW). In high school I started feeling more aggressive toward "noise makers." I couldn't focus in classes because I was so focused on imagining smashing my desk over any gum smacker's head just to make the terrible squishing sound stop. No one in my family understands what I mean when I ask them to please chew with their mouths closed, not that I'd actually stop hearing the sound of them chewing. In the past few years, I've been getting a little more comfortable with telling people I'm close with when they are bothering me, and they tend to be understanding, but typically I just realize that no one is cognizant of what they're doing. The worst thing is when I tell someone new about my issue and they jokingly say "oh you mean like this??" and then obnoxiously mimics the trigger sounds I've described. One time I got so frustrated that I mindlessly slapped a coworker in the face because she truly saw my pain as a joking matter. After it happened, I was mortified and hoped she wouldn't file some work harassment claim against me (she didn't). I often even have a hard time listening to podcasts and have to resist the temptation of throwing my phone across the room every time someone licks their lips, swallows, or simply breathes too heavily. There are many times I can't make it through an episode. There are many sounds that bother me, but eating and gum smacking are my worst triggers as they do not have a clear end point and I'm completely out of control in the situation. When possible, I try to ensure that I have music playing when dining alone or with friends or family. I've met a lot of people who say they have the same problem but then I always realize my case is more severe and that they're not as self aware as they think they are. I have recently made a friend who struggles with it just as much as I do and it is so therapeutic for both of us to be able to angrily vent to one another when we're feeling triggered. Don't know if this helps anyone else, but it was nice for me to vent.
everyonecanbuzzoff
 
Posts: 1
Joined: October 11th, 2016, 12:15 pm
Gender: Female
Issues: misophonia!
preferred pronoun: she

Re: Misophonia

Postby ohtheprofanity » October 11th, 2016, 1:21 pm

everyonecanbuzzoff (love the username, BTW) — I can relate to so much of what you said, ESPECIALLY about how unconscious people are of their behavior. They have no idea that chewing gum, clearing their throats constantly, or whatever it is, drives people like us to the point of insanity. But why would they? They aren't going through what we're going through when we hear a triggering sound. That's one of the biggest issues I've had with misophonia: Trying to relate it to others so they understand. It isn't easy. I often feel very alone with this condition IRL. One thing that has helped is that my husband, although he doesn't fully understand the condition, does his best to accommodate me. We eat dinner with the TV on so I won't hear chewing sounds, for instance.

I'm glad you have a friend who understands what you're going through, everyonecanbuzzoff. Feel free to vent here anytime, too. :)
User avatar
ohtheprofanity
 
Posts: 11
Joined: October 3rd, 2013, 5:57 am
Gender: Female
Issues: Anxiety, depression, misophonia, eating disorder (anorexia, purging subtype)
preferred pronoun: she

Re: Misophonia

Postby HowDidIGetHere » October 11th, 2016, 1:33 pm

One of my biggest fears is that I'm unconsciously making all the same noises that make my head explode when other people make them. Like, sometimes I'll be eating something and bite down too hard, and my teeth will click together accidentally. There's the discomfort of the direct experience, of course, but there's also this instantaneous anxiety about whether someone else might have heard it and had the same reaction I would have if I heard someone else do it.
'The field “Issues” is too long, a maximum of 80 characters is allowed.' Wow. Totally outed by a message board.

WTF Just Happened?—a new web magazine on coming out as mentally ill.
User avatar
HowDidIGetHere
 
Posts: 245
Joined: June 22nd, 2016, 9:51 am
Location: No fixed abode
Gender: Male
Issues: Bipolar II, Borderline/Avoidant Personality Disorder, child abuse/neglect
preferred pronoun: he

Re: Misophonia

Postby NeonFirefly » January 1st, 2017, 9:43 am

I am so glad for everyone's responses. I thought I was just being nitpicky or irritable. But I've found that I get these flash feelings of anger every time I hear someone chewing, especially gum. I once had a job where my cubiclemate kept chomping on salads, and it was borderline unbearable. I feel especially bad, however when people I care about chew gum and I hate that I have to tell them to "please stop". Does anyone know of any coping mechanism?s
User avatar
NeonFirefly
 
Posts: 11
Joined: December 4th, 2016, 5:58 am
Gender: Female
Issues: Depression, Anxiety, Love Addiction, possible autism? I don't know.
preferred pronoun: She

Re: Misophonia

Postby rogitgarg4411 » January 15th, 2017, 8:46 pm

That description makes it sound like some kind of emotional dysfunction.
rogitgarg4411
 
Posts: 77
Joined: January 8th, 2017, 9:59 pm
Gender: male
Issues: depression
preferred pronoun: he

Re: Misophonia

Postby rogitgarg4411 » January 18th, 2017, 8:21 pm

I think if they lived with someone with it they would see is physiological not psychological.
rogitgarg4411
 
Posts: 77
Joined: January 8th, 2017, 9:59 pm
Gender: male
Issues: depression
preferred pronoun: he

Previous

Return to Misophonia

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest