Author:Paul Gilmartin

Lynn Fox – Mom with BPD

The mother of two talks about living with Borderline Personality Disorder, her incredibly abusive father and her life in Silicon Valley doing PR for Apple, Twitter, Google, Star Wars and others.  Lynn hosts the podcast TechCares.

For tickets to Paul’s live podcast taping in Oakland on Jan 21st, click here

 

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#252 Paul Gets Interviewed

Paul’s friend, former Dinner and a Movie co-host (and former podcast guest) Lisa Arch asks Paul about his life, his struggles, the podcast and questions posed by listeners, who have been requesting an episode where all of Paul’s bullshit can reside in one place.  Well here it is.  Regular listeners may find that they’ve heard a lot of this information before, so this is really for the new listener who wants to get up to speed on what a nutjob Paul is.  We decided to take a week off from reading surveys.

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Rama I

The 28 year-old Syrian opens up about always being the minority wherever she lives (She was born in Syria, grew up in Brazil and now lives in the US), racism towards Arabs, recovering from sexual abuse, battling depression and anxiety and how getting help has saved her life.  Her boyfriend Haydn, who was the previous week’s guest also sits in on the interview.

Follow Rama on Twitter @Ramitcha1

 

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Jackie Kashian Live at Podfest

The writer/comedian/podcaster (Dork Forest) shares about her tumultuous upbringing, and struggles with anger, depression, connecting to people and being perimenopausal.

This episode is sponsored by Audible.  For a free audiobook of your choice and a free 30 day trial go to www.audiblepodcast.com/mental

Follow Jackie on Twitter @JackieKashian

Check out her podcast The Dork Forest

Check out her website www.jackiekashian.com

 

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3 Changes Newly-Diagnosed ADHD Adults Should Make: Guest Blog by Vee Cecil

While adults with ADHD don’t often exhibit the hyperactivity of children with the condition, they do have the inattention and impulsivity associated with the disorder. As Mayo Clinic explains, adult ADHD symptoms include difficulty focusing or concentrating, restlessness, impulsivity, trouble completing tasks, disorganization, frequent mood swings, struggling to cope with stress, and a hot temper. These symptoms often lead to several problems, such as unstable relationships, poor work performance, and low self-esteem.

 

Once they have a diagnosis, adults can make their lives easier by making some changes. Newly-diagnosed ADHD adults often feel a sense of relief for finally understanding why they are the way they are, but that relief may turn to fear or regret. That’s why the first step newly-diagnosed ADHD adults should take is to accept and honor their feelings. Once people come to terms with the diagnosis, they are able to take positive steps toward dealing with it.

 

  1. Determine the Best Treatment. After being diagnosed with adult ADHD, people should work with their doctor to determine the best treatment for their symptoms and situations. As PsychCentral.com explains, current treatments commonly involve medication, psychological counseling, or a combination of the two. The combination of therapy and medication is thought to be the most effective treatment. Of course, your doctor will discuss the benefits and risks of medication, and it may take some time to identify the best treatment. Counseling often includes an educational component, so that newly-diagnosed adults gain a better understanding of the disorder and how to live with it.

 

  1. Proactively Manage Your Impulses. One change ADHD adults can make to better manage their impulsivity is to consider the situations in which they are most likely to be impulsive and make a list of them. Identifying those situations is the first step to better managing them, because ADHD adults will be more aware of the need to think before acting. Another great way to manage impulses is to get plenty of exercise. And as this article notes, going on a walk with a furry friend is an excellent way to work off some of your extra energy, and in turn, clear your mind. It has also been proven to reduce feelings of loneliness and depression.

 

  1. Get Organized with Structure and Neat Habits. The inattentiveness and distractibility associated with adult ADHD often results in difficulty being organized at work and at home. This also tends to make ADHD adults feel overwhelmed. Breaking tasks into smaller chunks and developing a system for getting organized is one of the best changes ADHD adults can make. Developing a structure for organization and adopting neat habits will make a world of difference for ADHD adults.

 

For organizing at home, determine which objects are necessary and which you can store or trash. Though this article addresses the needs of children with ADHD, its advice holds true: organizing work areas, setting up a “staging area” by the door for keys, wallets, etc., and storing items in labeled bins can be a big help in managing your ADHD at home.

 

At work, use lists and make notes for tasks, projects, deadlines, etc., and consider using a to-do list app so you can set reminders for tasks as well. Finally, help yourself by avoiding procrastination. If it is a task that requires a very short amount of time, do it now to alleviate the feeling of being overwhelmed.

 

Certainly, newly-diagnosed ADHD adults have much to consider upon learning they have the disorder. But, there are changes you can make to manage your symptoms and make your life easier.

 

Vee Cecil is a wellness coach, bootcamp instructor, and all-around health enthusiast. When she isn’t training clients or playing outside with her family, she is working on her recently-launched blog where she shares her favorite wellness tips and recipes.

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